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Why Haven’t We Bumped Into Another Universe Yet?

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Why Haven’t We Bumped Into Another Universe Yet?

If the multiverse is real, why hasn’t our Universe, in a sea of infinite possibilities, run into another one at least once?

Why Haven’t We Bumped Into Another Universe Yet?

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Artist’s logarithmic scale conception of the observable universe. Note that we’re limited in how far we can see back by the amount of time that’s occurred since the hot Big Bang: 13.8 billion years, or (including the expansion of the Universe) 46 billion light years. Anyone living in our Universe, at any location, would see almost exactly the same thing from their vantage point.(Wikipedia user Pablo Carlos Budassi)
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The expanding Universe, full of galaxies and the complex structure we observe today, arose from a smaller, hotter, denser, more uniform state. But what lies outside the observable Universe, by definition, cannot be observed. (C. Faucher-Giguère, A. Lidz, and L. Hernquist, Science 319, 5859 (47))
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Inflation set up the hot Big Bang and gave rise to the observable Universe we have access to, but we can only measure the last tiny fraction of a second of inflation’s impact on our Universe. This is enough, however, to give us a large slew of predictions to go out an look for, many of which have already been observationally confirmed. (E. Siegel, with images derived from ESA/Planck and the DoE/NASA/ NSF interagency task force on CMB research)
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Inflation causes space to expand exponentially, which can very quickly result in any pre-existing curved space appearing flat. (E. Siegel (L); Ned Wright’s cosmology tutorial (R))
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When cosmic inflation occurs, the energy inherent in space is large, as it is at the top of this hill. As the ball rolls down into the valley, that energy converts into particles. (E. Siegel)
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If inflation is a quantum field, then the field value spreads out over time, with different regions of space taking different realizations of the field value. In many regions, the field value will wind up in the bottom of the valley, ending inflation, but in many more, inflation will continue, arbitrarily far into the future. (E. Siegel / Beyond The Galaxy)
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Wherever inflation occurs (blue cubes), it gives rise to exponentially more regions of space with each step forward in time. Even if there are many cubes where inflation ends (red Xs), there are far more regions where inflation will continue on into the future. The fact that this never comes to an end is what makes inflation ‘eternal’ once it begins. (E. Siegel / Beyond The Galaxy)
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While many independent Universes are predicted to be created in an inflating spacetime, inflation never ends everywhere at once, but rather only in distinct, independent areas separated by space that continues to inflate. This is where the scientific motivation for a Multiverse comes from, and why no two Universes will ever collide. (Karen46 / FreeImages)
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An illustration of multiple, independent Universes, causally disconnected from one another in an ever-expanding cosmic ocean, is one depiction of the Multiverse idea. (Ozytive / Public domain)

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